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In My Humble Opinion

Closing The Barn Door

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    Now that the horse has escaped the barn and is running rampant through the middle east; killing infidels, pillaging cities, and cutting off heads; it would seem that President Obama has decided it is finally time to make some gesture toward closing the barn door.  With ISIS acting with impunity and gaining strength daily, the President's speech seems to be an indication that he has at long last been dragged to developing some kind of strategy for dealing with them.  It mostly seems to be that we are going to drop a lot of bombs, but keep our boots off the ground.  I guess the "trainers" we will be sending won't be wearing boots, at least not combat boots.  Sounds a little like Viet Nam.  We will be a part of a "broad coalition" which seems to be largely invisible.  The mission will be to "degrade and destroy ISIL", which must be words that rated well in a focus group, as the President keeps repeating them ad nauseum.  Therein lies the problem with the Presidents response to this conflict, and the problem with many of the military actions we have taken since the Viet Nam war; it is an action dictated more by political expediency than a reasoned and militarily sound solution.

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     What if Superman was Clark Kent's disguise, instead of the other way around?  I mean, what if Clark Kent only pretended to be a super hero in order to pursue his true calling of reporter at the Daily Planet?   What if, when he was supposed to be fighting crime and saving Lois, he snuck away to a phone booth to become... ta da, "Clark Kent, intrepid reporter", and busily wrote his next article instead of saving the world?   Is a hero a hero if he neglects to be heroic?  Is a mighty man mighty if he refuses, or is unable to use his might?  When is Superman not Superman?

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    Police officers are your friends.  They are public servants.  They are there to keep us safe from criminals.  In a perfect world, these would all be statements that were always true.  In an increasingly paternalistic and government dominated society, this is not the way many of our communities view law enforcement professionals.  Rather, law enforcement is viewed as the overbearing or possibly even abusive parent, who is to be feared more than respected, hated rather than appreciated.  Regardless of your interpretation of the facts in Ferguson, it is difficult to deny that much of the community and the others who have descended on the scene have little trust for white policemen.  Aside from the motivations of a few of the activists who make their money from unrest, the distrust of the community for the police force comes from a perception that the police are their enemy.  One can argue the rationality of this conclusion, but there is little doubt of its cause; the treating of law abiding citizens as though they were criminals.  Persecution along side of prosecution.  I am not one to see nefarious motives behind every action, but it is an undeniable fact in our history that blacks have often been treated as guilty until proven innocent by our law enforcement community and society itself.  Trust is difficult to rebuild, and even innocent actions can be interpreted as aggression by the historical "enemy".  I am not excusing the generalizing of enemy status to all law enforcement or even to all white people, I'm simply explaining it; and after all, whites have done a lot of generalizing of their own.


Babel

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    Proving that no portion of these fifty states is immune from liberal fascism, a Texas principal has essentially lost her job for requiring her students to speak English only on the campus.  This same immersion technique was used by my high school Spanish teacher, of course with Spanish as the operative language, and is an effective strategy for learning language.  The principal's reasoning was that since testing was to be given in English, it might be helpful if students were fluent in the language, supposing that graduating from high school and speaking the language of the country you live in might just be helpful toward insuring successful lives for her charges.  "Silly principal... you're fired!"

Heartless

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"When a man's an empty kettle,

He should be on his mettle--

And yet I'm torn apart.

Just because I'm presumin'

That I could be a human

If I only had a heart..."


                     Yip Harburg, from The Wizard of Oz



    It is the unique attribute of human beings that we are born with human hearts.  I don't mean the the fist sized blood pump in our chest cavity, which is not essentially different than that of many other mammals; I am speaking of the figurative center of conscience, wisdom, and love... the thing that makes us human.  Just as heart disease is common in the physical realm, these spiritual hearts are often found to be corrupted, often beyond resuscitation.  The absence of a functioning human heart where one expects to find one, often leads people to seek elsewhere for the succor they had hoped to find in their fellow human beings.  Unsurprisingly, they may gravitate toward the simpler hearts of pets, where expectations are lower and disillusionments rare.  They join churches and clubs, or throw themselves into careers or hobbies trying to replace that which can only be found in one place.  They imagine where man has failed, governmental structures, agencies and bureaucracies can succeed.

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         "Fancy thinking the Beast was something you could hunt and kill!  You knew, didn't you?  I'm part of you?  Close, close, close!  I'm the reason why it's a no go?  Why things are what they are?" 


                                             William Golding, Lord of the Flies



    Remember the days when Barack Obama was referred to as "the adult in the room"?  As with the young it's a coveted position for a politician to hold, a perception they very much wish to convey.  Unfortunately, saying it doesn't make it so, and desiring to be viewed as an adult doesn't always make you behave like one.  Cover-ups, arrogance, belligerence, outright dishonesty, shirking responsibility while finding time for pleasure... these are not signs of adulthood, but of adolescence (though so-called adults often have a hard time moving past their adolescence!).  It is unclear whether our adolescent President is the product of the nation, in Benjamin Button fashion, regressing from adulthood, or if the nation's further regression is part of Obama's fundamental transformation of America.


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    Legend speaks of a time of great darkness.  Many hundreds of years ago, nation fought against nation.  Corrupt leaders killed at will; great and evil deeds were committed, domination and even cannibalism; much blood was spilt.  Then there was a child born to a young virgin who grew to be a man whom the people called "The Peacemaker".  No, this was not ancient Israel, but right here in upstate New York.  The man was named Dekanawida of the Huron Indians in Canada.  The legend says he came as a prophet to the warring tribes of our upstate area probably around the mid 1100's, or possibly as late as the 1400's.  He found Hiawatha, a leader of the Mohawk tribe, or possibly of the Onondaga, wandering in the land of the Mohawks.  This is not Longfellow's warrior "Hiawatha" who was probably quite another Indian altogether with quite a different, less poetic name:  Nanabozho.  Hiawatha was a sullen wanderer, maybe a cannibal, whose own evil chief had killed his wife and daughters.  Dekanawida convinces Hiawatha of his plan for peace, and Hiawatha, who had a gift for oratory, becomes a great asset to Dekanawida who himself had language difficulties with the New York Indians, and a speech impediment.  Hiawatha is even able to help The Peacemaker to exorcize and convert his evil chief to the way of peace.

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   "Amicus meus, inimicus inimici mei."  (My friend, the enemy of my enemy)


    Politics is a blood sport.  It is not for the faint of heart.  It is not an arena where we all sit down with each other, agree on everything, and believe in one accord... that's church.  ...Well, no I guess it's not church either.  Increasingly it would seem, people believe they are participating in the political process by demanding almost universal agreement, pure devotion to whatever issues they deem important, or they take their ball (or in this case their vote) and go home.




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    We are not a perfect nation.  We are not a perfect people, we do not expect to have perfect leaders.  The story of America is more about redemption than it is about perfection.  We try our best, and we sometimes make mistakes... but when we do,we fix them.  Freedom includes the freedom to fail, but then the freedom to try again.  We are a nation that believes in second chances, forgiveness, and mercy.  We eschew the holier than thou attitude, we strive to coexist, we reserve our harshest judgement for the judgmental.  In our tolerance, however, we risk tolerating those who would poison us, infect us, destroy us.


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It was before daybreak on an April morning in 1775.  Paul Revere and William Dawes had made their famous rides through Massachusetts to warn the minutemen that the British were coming to confiscate rebel munitions stored at Concord.  The Redcoats would need to pass through Lexington to reach Concord, and it was there that Captain John Parker assembled his small militia, mostly comprised of relatives, friends, and neighbors.  The assembly was meant more as a demonstration of political and military determination than to confront or even impede the British forces.  The small 80 man militia gathered in the commons in a parade formation, not blocking the road to Concord and in plain sight.  Instead of just continuing on to Concord the Redcoats turned to confront the patriots and disarm them.  One of the officers began waving his sword about and arrogantly shouting, "Lay down your arms, you damned rebels!"  Greatly outnumbered, and not intending to begin a battle foolishly, Captain Parker instructed his men to go home.  His voice, raspy and muffled by tuberculosis, went unheard by several of the men amidst the yelling of the Brits, and the ones who did hear were not quick to disperse; none lay down their arms.   A shot was fired, no one knows from which side or by who, but it was "the shot heard round the world".  The Brits opened fire on the Colonists killing eight, and wounding ten, and the Revolutionary War had begun.

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Kevin Cail

Kevin's varied background includes working as a union rep, as well as positions of industrial management. With a background in psychology he has worked as an administrator in the field of Autism, and written a counseling/advice column for a local periodical. He has served on the board of directors for several non-profit organizations, and has operated a small business for over 20 years. He is the father of seven and grandfather of fifteen. With this blog he turns his attention to one of his greatest interests, the area of politics.

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